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Tiering System Question

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What qualifies as a higher dimensional bulk space in the context of the Low 2-C definition on the tiering system page?

Like say you have this all encompassing “astral sea” and within it are these spheres that represent entire universes. Presupposing they aren’t compactified, would this “astral sea” be considered a Low 2-C space since it embeds these universes as subsections of its grander space?
 
If the universes are timelines then it'd be low 2-C. If universes are just spatially 3-D and 3-A then would probably only be high 3-A at best if this sea was infinite/had infinite universes (which I assume not since you said low 2-C) otherwise just 3-A (all the universes combined).

I'm not too understanding on subject of branes and bulks so I was only able to answer the example.
 
If the universes are timelines then it'd be low 2-C. If universes are just spatially 3-D and 3-A then would probably only be high 3-A at best if this sea was infinite/had infinite universes (which I assume not since you said low 2-C) otherwise just 3-A (all the universes combined).

I'm not too understanding on subject of branes and bulks so I was only able to answer the example.
Basically assuming they're only 3-A universes then you'd probably be out of luck getting low 2-C without some pretty damning statements about the astral sea. If the universes are infinite in size however and the astral sea is infinite and trivializes these universes then low 2-C isn't out of the question.
 
If the universes are timelines then it'd be low 2-C. If universes are just spatially 3-D and 3-A then would probably only be high 3-A at best if this sea was infinite/had infinite universes (which I assume not since you said low 2-C) otherwise just 3-A (all the universes combined).

I'm not too understanding on subject of branes and bulks so I was only able to answer the example.
I'll take over 😈

you see the astral sea would have to totally encompass the smaller "universes"

what I mean by this is; AS(Inaccessible)>SU

It's essentially so big that it warrants higher dimenonsility than the SUs which would be 4D
 
I'll take over 😈

you see the astral sea would have to totally encompass the smaller "universes"

what I mean by this is; AS(Inaccessible)>SU

It's essentially so big that it warrants higher dimenonsility than the SUs which would be 4D
What do you mean by “totally encompass”?
 
Depends on if these universes have their own flow of time or not, which would make it 2-C ish, if not and nothing is elaborated on, it would just upscale beyond the observable universe.
 
So then what is meant by larger bulk space? Cuz it seems I’m getting conflicting answers. Like what do we consider to be “embedded into a larger bulk space”?
 
So then what is meant by larger bulk space?
This is a term used to describe Brane Cosmology.

The central idea is that the visible, three-dimensional universe is restricted to a brane inside a higher-dimensional space, called the "bulk" (also known as "hyperspace"). In the bulk model, at least some of the extra dimensions are extensive (possibly infinite), and other branes may be moving through this bulk.
 
This is a term used to describe Brane Cosmology.

The central idea is that the visible, three-dimensional universe is restricted to a brane inside a higher-dimensional space, called the "bulk" (also known as "hyperspace"). In the bulk model, at least some of the extra dimensions are extensive (possibly infinite), and other branes may be moving through this bulk.
Ok can you describe how my example would fit into this/what part of my example would change in order to fit that definition?
 
Ok can you describe how my example would fit into this/what part of my example would change in order to fit that definition?
In my opinion, an explanation such as the universes in question being independent of each other and the existence of an Astral Sea covering the spaces and universes between these universes and these universes swimming in the Astral Sea would be sufficient for Low 2-C.
 
In my opinion, an explanation such as the universes in question being independent of each other and the existence of an Astral Sea covering the spaces and universes between these universes and these universes swimming in the Astral Sea would be sufficient for Low 2-C.
Depends on if these universes have their own flow of time or not, which would make it 2-C ish, if not and nothing is elaborated on, it would just upscale beyond the observable universe.
Glass would you agree with Code
 
Actually, this is just as a 3D object will completely cover a 2D object, a 2D object can be moved freely within the additional axis of a 3D object, and the space between the axes of 2D objects will be covered by a 3rd axis.

To explain more concretely how this works, imagine a empty cube with 2 opposite surfaces cut off and a square with the same area as one face of this cube and move the square you imagine inside the cube, the axis on which the square moves is the additional axis the cube has. As a result, the universe/s floating in the Astral Sea are the square/s we move within this cube.
 
I was asked to reply here.
What qualifies as a higher dimensional bulk space in the context of the Low 2-C definition on the tiering system page?

Like say you have this all encompassing “astral sea” and within it are these spheres that represent entire universes. Presupposing they aren’t compactified, would this “astral sea” be considered a Low 2-C space since it embeds these universes as subsections of its grander space?
You're going about this the wrong way, the better question to ask is "what disqualifies a space from serving as a higher dimensional bulk in the context of Low 2-C?"
  • Something called a "Universe" is a Low 2-C Space-Time Continuum by default; unless contradicted.
  • A self-contained Space-Time/Low 2-C Universe is encompassed/surrounded by a higher dimensional bulk space by default; unless contradicted.
The reason why I say the better question to ask is when it's disqualified is because of this:
Note that this criteria of separation is only an argument against two realms being separate universes, if a feat of travel between the realms by regular 3D means occurs or it is otherwise known for certain that they are not separated in the above sense. If the realms fulfill the requirements laid out in the prior section and no such travel occurs, then the realms can be considered proper separate universes even if the means by which they are separated is not explored.
The space between timelines is a higher dimensional bulk space by default: unless there's a reason for the timelines to be non-spatiotemporally separate, like anti-feats of physical travel between universes.

If the cosmic spheres meet the requirements for being Low 2-C constructs already (which I'm assuming is the case in your example, if it's true that they've been called "universes" directly), then the Astral Sea containing them is indeed, a higher dimensional bulk space. Visualize the nature of parallel universes along these lines:
latest

Upwards/downwards will represent time (the blue axis), left/right will represent the whole 3 standard dimensions of space (the red axis), and forwards/backwards will represent the 5th dimension that separates universes (the green axis). Our timeline could be imagined as a board that stands on the ground, like a wall. So, going left on that wall would equate to moving left in our universe, moving right would equate going right in our universe, going up would equate moving towards the future in our timeline and moving down on the wall would equate time travelling into the past.

So we have one timeline. To add a second timeline we simply add a second board and stand it up parallel to the first one a little further forward. This board, too, has direction just like the first: going left on that board would equate to moving left in that universe, moving right would equate going right in that universe, going up would equate moving towards the future in that timeline and moving down on the board would equate time travelling into the past in that timeline. The fact that one board stands further forward than the other means they are in two different locations in the multiverse. These boards are parallel to each other and non-intersecting, which means no matter how far they could extend in space and time, even an infinite distance, they will never touch. The gap between the boards is the distance between the two timelines, which introduces an extradimensional axis with distinct directions that describe said parallelism.

To put it simply, a "higher dimensional bulk space" as the tiering system page describes it is just any space that contains universes that meet the requirements for Tier 2, and allows space-time continuums to be described as parallel entities.
Like say you have this all encompassing “astral sea” and within it are these spheres that represent entire universes. Presupposing they aren’t compactified, would this “astral sea” be considered a Low 2-C space since it embeds these universes as subsections of its grander space?
Indeed, that space with a single universe would be considered Low 2-C in size, unless it viewed the universes as qualitatively inferior, in which case it would be tier 1 in size. That means viewing universes as infinitesimal or unreal/fiction. Such a space being infinite wouldn't count since time is infinite by default, so knowing a space containing a universe is "infinitely large" in a vacuum doesn't mean anything as it could simply be infinite on a 4-D level, in which case it's still Low 2-C.

I hope I managed to provide you with a sufficient answer.
 
I was asked to reply here.

You're going about this the wrong way, the better question to ask is "what disqualifies a space from serving as a higher dimensional bulk in the context of Low 2-C?"
  • Something called a "Universe" is a Low 2-C Space-Time Continuum by default; unless contradicted.
  • A self-contained Space-Time/Low 2-C Universe is encompassed/surrounded by a higher dimensional bulk space by default; unless contradicted.
The reason why I say the better question to ask is when it's disqualified is because of this:

The space between timelines is a higher dimensional bulk space by default: unless there's a reason for the timelines to be non-spatiotemporally separate, like anti-feats of physical travel between universes.

If the cosmic spheres meet the requirements for being Low 2-C constructs already (which I'm assuming is the case in your example, if it's true that they've been called "universes" directly), then the Astral Sea containing them is indeed, a higher dimensional bulk space. Visualize the nature of parallel universes along these lines:
latest

Upwards/downwards will represent time (the blue axis), left/right will represent the whole 3 standard dimensions of space (the red axis), and forwards/backwards will represent the 5th dimension that separates universes (the green axis). Our timeline could be imagined as a board that stands on the ground, like a wall. So, going left on that wall would equate to moving left in our universe, moving right would equate going right in our universe, going up would equate moving towards the future in our timeline and moving down on the wall would equate time travelling into the past.

So we have one timeline. To add a second timeline we simply add a second board and stand it up parallel to the first one a little further forward. This board, too, has direction just like the first: going left on that board would equate to moving left in that universe, moving right would equate going right in that universe, going up would equate moving towards the future in that timeline and moving down on the board would equate time travelling into the past in that timeline. The fact that one board stands further forward than the other means they are in two different locations in the multiverse. These boards are parallel to each other and non-intersecting, which means no matter how far they could extend in space and time, even an infinite distance, they will never touch. The gap between the boards is the distance between the two timelines, which introduces an extradimensional axis with distinct directions that describe said parallelism.

To put it simply, a "higher dimensional bulk space" as the tiering system page describes it is just any space that contains universes that meet the requirements for Tier 2, and allows space-time continuums to be described as parallel entities.

Indeed, that space with a single universe would be considered Low 2-C in size, unless it viewed the universes as qualitatively inferior, in which case it would be tier 1 in size. That means viewing universes as infinitesimal or unreal/fiction. Such a space being infinite wouldn't count since time is infinite by default, so knowing a space containing a universe is "infinitely large" in a vacuum doesn't mean anything as it could simply be infinite on a 4-D level, in which case it's still Low 2-C.

I hope I managed to provide you with a sufficient answer.
Yeah that answers it pretty good, but just to make sure I’m comprehending it right let me test my knowledge real quick.

The astral sea embeds multiple spheres, each sphere is a universe. Those spheres would by default be Low 2-C unless contradicted. However they aren’t infinitesimal in comparison to the astral sea, they are instead large but finite in depiction spheres swimming in an infinite astral sea. That astral sea would just then end up being a large tier 2 structure than the ones swimming in it. Is that correct?
 
Yeah that answers it pretty good, but just to make sure I’m comprehending it right let me test my knowledge real quick.

The astral sea embeds multiple spheres, each sphere is a universe. Those spheres would by default be Low 2-C unless contradicted. However they aren’t infinitesimal in comparison to the astral sea, they are instead large but finite in depiction spheres swimming in an infinite astral sea. That astral sea would just then end up being a large tier 2 structure than the ones swimming in it. Is that correct?
Yeah, you've got it. It's a bit complicated, but tiers 2 and above don't have a 1:1 correlation with mathematical dimensions. Tiers 2-C to 2-A don't mean "4-D," but 4 levels of infinity. A finite 4-D object is not Tier 2.

In this case, the Astral Sea is dimensionally 5-D, but since its 5th dimension doesn't meet the standards for an additional level of infinity, it's just Low 2-C in size.
 
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